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Why things go wrong

admin | June 28, 2016

While many houses get built without any major glitches, in some cases it can become a stressful experience laden with problems. There are a few key reasons for things going wrong. These are:

  • Unrealistic expectations of the owner.
  • Over-demand for services and materials leading to shortages and delays.
  • Lack of communication and misunderstandings.
  • Unscrupulousness or dishonesty (on either side).

Listed below are more specific examples of these.

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Problems caused by the owners

admin | June 28, 2016

Make sure you don’t cause problems for your builder by:

  • Failing to do what you’ve promised, for example, arranging the plumber to turn up on a certain day.
  • Failing to pay on time. The builder shouldn’t have to wait for overdue progress payments as they will be carrying the cost of the materials and wages.
  • Failing to make the final payment – some people hold on to the final retention payment for longer than necessary, even after everything has been signed off and faults rectified. This is unscrupulous and may be a breach of contract.
  • Misunderstanding the plans, specifications or contract documentation and making incorrect assumptions. It is difficult to visualise what the finished house will look like, but it is not the fault of the builder if at the end, you say “that’s not what I expected” if everything is built properly to the specifications.
  • Buying materials for the job, without consulting the builder, that are cheaper than the quote for them in the contract documentation (so when there’s a problem with the product it leads to arguments as to who gets it fixed or replaced. Also the builder’s guarantee may not cover it).
  • Going into the project with the attitude that the builder and subcontractors will try to rip you off, without understanding the complexity of the building trade.
  • Having unrealistic expectations, for example, you install cheaper soundproofing and are disappointed when you can still hear people moving around upstairs. Do your homework about these sorts of features and if they aren’t what you expected, don’t use it as an excuse to not pay the builder.
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Delays, delays, delays

admin | June 28, 2016

In recent times builders and other trades have been in enormous demand, as building work has increased around the country.
This could cause potential problems on your project. People we have talked to have reported huge delays in waiting for builders and other contractors to arrive, only to have them disappear for weeks at a time in the middle of the job. The failure of one trade to turn up on time leads to a domino effect. Re-scheduling everyone is difficult because there are so many people affected.
Other events that can delay work are:

  • Hold-ups in getting building or resource consents, also due to council backlogs because of huge demand.
  • Bad weather – which the builder can’t control.
  • Finishing, for example, the painting takes longer in winter and bad weather.
  • Injury to a worker – it may be difficult for the builder to find a suitable replacement.
  • Variations – you might have to take some of the responsibility for this if you have asked for lots of changes. Or there could be shortages in the supply of materials, also a result of a high demand in the building industry.
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Shoddy work

admin | June 28, 2016

The shortage of trades people could be one of the reasons people are reporting increasing amounts of shoddy workmanship.
Arguably, the quality of workmanship is being compromised because contractors are rushing work in order to get to the next job. While it is normal for builders and subcontractors to be involved on more than one job at the same time, if they are overcommitted they risk compromising quality in the rush to get things done quickly.
The problem seems to be made worse by a lack of qualified trades people, meaning builders are having to hire less skilled staff.
If you think the workmanship on your job is substandard, you could hire a building consultant to do an independent check.

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If a building firm goes under

admin | June 28, 2016

If your builder’s operation fails, you may be left with an unfinished house, or a house with lots of unresolved defects.
Unpaid subcontractors may take back materials they have supplied. In this case you may have legal remedies. Talk to a lawyer.
Tip: Make sure it is not in your contract that you pay for work in advance. This will protect you if the builder does not complete the job. (Except for any deposit you’ve agreed in the contract.)

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